First Women’s Rights Convention is Held in U.S. 

First Women’s Rights Convention is Held in U.S. 

U.S. #959

Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott (pictured on this stamp) heralded the start of the women’s rights movement on July 19, 1848, when they hosted the first convention on the rights of women in the U.S.

The two had met years earlier when they were both refused admission to the World Anti-Slavery Convention because they were women. They sent out a call in a local newspaper that was answered by 200 women on July 19. Stanton shared her “Declaration of Sentiments and Grievances,” which was modeled after the Declaration of Independence, but also brought up the injustices women faced.

Men were invited to attend the second day of the convention, and about 40 did, including Frederick Douglass. The assembly adopted and signed the declaration and passed 12 resolutions calling for the equal rights of women.

From that first meeting sprang annual women’s rights conventions that ultimately led to the passage of the 19th Amendment, granting women the right to vote in 1920.

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7 responses to "First Women’s Rights Convention is Held in U.S. "

7 thoughts on “First Women’s Rights Convention is Held in U.S. ”

  1. I have been a stamp collector for over 62 years. I have learned much about U.S history by collecting U.S stamps. Your “This Day in History” adds to my knowledge. An email a day would be great.
    Thanks for the good work and keep it going.

    Reply
  2. Loving these! Reading a short passage about the history behind these beautiful, miniature works of art makes me appreciate them even more! Thanks! Good job!

    Reply
  3. This Day In History is very educational and hope you continue it indefinitely. At my age, I cannot purchase stamps any more. I have given my stamps to charity and hope they find a use for them. You are, in my opinion, doing a public service by printing the history of our country and educating the public about our history. Thank you again for your help.

    Reply
  4. Thank you, Dennis P. I to have learned about world history and culture
    thru stamp collecting. I have been collecting for about 50 years. To Francis Mattingly. I remember a dealer by the name of Mattingly. They were usually present at Stamp and Coin Conventions. Are you related?

    Reply

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